Nickel Chrome Plating

The Nickel-Chrome plating refers to a dual-layer compound of nickel and hard chrome.

This process is an electroplating process, which provides a corrosion and wear resistance above all the standards a normal chrome plating can provide.

The nickel hard chrome plating process consists of three layers: a relatively first thick metal coating of semi-bright nickel (60- 75% of the total nickel thickness), a second thinner bright nickel coating and the third of hard-chrome coating.

Tre-P knows how to chrome motorcycle parts thanks to this type of coatings, which provide increased corrosion resistance.

Dual-layer nickel coatings show a marked improvement in corrosion performance compared with single layer coatings.

TRE P’s nickel advantages

Dual-layer nickel coatings show a marked improvement in corrosion performance compared with single layer coatings.

These are the main advantages you will benefit with the Dual-layer nickel plating:

  • Unsurpassed fast rates of brightening and levelling
  • Ideal for high quality thin deposits on unpolished steel and tubular steel
  • Process can be operated at lower metal concentration and lower temperatures without sacrificing performance.

The mechanism of corrosion

Because nickel chrome plating considerably increases the corrosion resistance, we will provide an explanation of the corrosion mechanism:

Under the effects of moisture and atmospheric contaminants, the corrosion initiates in cracks or pores on the chromium topcoat.

Seen as chromium is electrochemically more noble than nickel, the corrosive attack takes place in the bright nickel with the formation of cracks.  As the corrosion continues, the cracks become deeper and they eventually reach the substrate, resulting in rusting or other base metal corrosions.

At the same time the thin chromium layer may become partly dislodged trough undercutting.

With the dual-layer nickel-chrome, the corrosion will take place on the bright nickel layer (the top layer), thanks to the double plating the corrosive attack reaches the interface, and spread only on the top layer instead of penetrating up to the semi-bright nickel layer (the deeper layer).

The corrosion mechanism is considerably delayed and some times avoided thanks to this double nickel-chrome plating.